Monthly Archives: March 2015


An Outlook addin to control Reply-Alls

By standss - Comments ( 1 ) Monday, March 23rd, 2015

In our previous post we discussed Email Etiquette and Reply-Alls. In this article we wil show you an Outlook addon that is already used by thousands of users in companies of all sizes around the world to control this problem.

Reply Guard for Outlook is actually one of the components of our Send Guard for Outlook addin.

Reply Guard installs inside Outlook and displays a prompt similar to the following when you click Reply or Reply-All on any email with multiple recipients.

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While initial version of the addin simply displayed a warning prompt, based on the advice of our customers, we changed the addin to display the prompt shown above.

This is preferable to a simple warning message because it immediately makes it obvious to the sender exactly who the email is being sent to.

Users can also change recipients directly from the screen without having to go back to the email.

Stopping Users from Replying All to your Emails

At the request from one of our largest corporate customers, we also added the ability for the sender to decide whether users can actually do a Reply-All on emails or not.

Reply Guard adds check boxes to the Outlook Ribbon that is displayed when you write a new email.

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This feature is dependent on the version of Outlook that the recipient is using to read the email. It works particularly well for internal emails broadcasts.

Trying Reply Guard

Reply Guard was based on the needs of small and corporate customers.

Messages in the screen can be customized if required based on corporate/legal guidelines and policies. The software can also be deployed with customized settings across the network if required.

You can find more information on Reply Guard for Outlook on our website. We also have a fully functional 30 day version that you can try for yourself.

 

Categories : Uncategorized Comments ( 1 )

Email Etiquette and Reply-to-Alls

By standss - Comments ( 1 ) Monday, March 23rd, 2015

The Reply-to-All button in Outlook can be both dangerous and an enormous time-waster, particularly in larger organizations. In this post we look at when it is OK to Reply All and how you can configure Outlook so that you (and others) make the correct choice between Reply and Reply-to-All.

What is the problem with Reply-All?

  1. Productivity: It wastes time and important network bandwidth.

Have you ever been part of an email chain in where people start doing Reply-Alls and saying things like “Noted”, “Received” or “Thanks”?

Now imagine this in a big organization where hundreds of users are wasting valuable time looking at those emails.

  1. Confidentiality

Sometimes you want to email only the Sender of the email with your thoughts and extra information. Clicking Reply-All can accidentally put everyone in the loop and can lead to embarrassing and possibly expensive mistakes.

When should you use Reply All?

This article from the Huffington Post on Email Etiquette has some scenarios that provide guidance on deciding.

The answer to this is common sense.

Use Reply All only when all recipients NEED to be kept informed. Otherwise just Reply to the people who actually need to be emailed.

The other way to decide is to look at the original email to see if it meant to be a conversation or discussion.  If the answer is YES, and you are adding something of value then a Reply-All is appropriate.

When should you NOT use Reply All?

  1. For a personal comment or conversation with one of the recipients, particularly if you are bad-mouthing one of the other recipients.
  2. When you want to acknowledge to the original sender that you have received the email with a short.

Is it possible to reduce Reply-Alls in your organization?

Out of the box, Outlook requires users to exercise restraint. Unfortunately this rarely happens. It is too easy to click Reply-All.

We created Reply-Guard for Outlook to assist with this. Reply Guard is a component of our Send Guard for Outlook product that is already used by thousands of companies around the world.

Reply Guard does more than just warn users. It immediately makes it obvious to users exactly who will be receiving the email.

You can find out more about Reply Guard in the next blog post.

Should you Forward or Redirect emails?

By standss - Comments ( 18 ) Monday, March 16th, 2015

What do you do when you get an email that you know can be better answered by someone else? Chances are you Forward the email. I recently found out about Redirects which are often more appropriate than Forwards. Here’s how to do a redirect and why it may be better than Forward.

When you forward an email to someone, and the person replies, the reply comes back to YOU and not the original sender, so then you’re stuck forwarding it again.

You can avoid being the messenger-in-between by doing a REDIRECT instead of a Forward.

To Redirect an Email in Outlook:

Open the email in its own Window (i.e. you can’t do this if you’re looking at the email in the Reading Pane)

Select the Message Tab and then click Actions (or More Move Actions depending in your version of Outlook).

Click Resend this Message.

The message You do not appear to be the original sender of this message. Are you sure you want to resend it? will be displayed. Click Yes.

Address the email to the person you want to send it to (and type any notes etc. that you want in the email).

Click Send.

What happens when the recipient receives the email and clicks Reply

When the recipient receives the email, it will show that it is from you but on behalf of the original sender.

Now when the he or she clicks Reply, the reply will go to the original sender instead of to you.

Some final thoughts:

If you still want to be included in the reply to the email then I recommend that you use Forward instead of Redirect but remember to CC the original sender of the email too.

However if you just want to pass on the email and then stay out of it, Redirect is the way to go.

Did you know about Redirects (I didn’t)? Do you think they are useful? Let us know by leaving a comment below.

 

 

 

Categories : General, Outlook Email Tips Comments ( 18 )

Q: Why CTRL-F is NOT Find in Outlook?(Ans: Bill Gates)

By standss - Comments ( 2 ) Tuesday, March 10th, 2015

Have you ever pressed CTRL-F to find something (in Outlook) to discover that it does not work! For some reason CTRL-F does a Forward instead of a Find. Here’s a bit of history as to why this (strange) decision was made and alternative keyboard shortcuts to do a Find in Outlook.

CTRL-F is probably the best and most widely used Keyboard shortcut. Whether you’re using Excel, Word, Internet Explorer, Adobe Reader, Chrome… the list goes on… CTRL-F brings up the Find dialog. Except in Outlook…

Why… Oh Why???
According to The Old New Thing the reason for this strange behaviour is Bill Gates.

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What keyboard shortcuts can you use to Find in Outlook?

Unfortunately there is no way to change how Outlook handles CTRL-F. The two alternatives you can use are F4 or CTRL-SHIFT-F. By the way these shortcuts only seem to work when you have an actual email open (and not from a folder).

Thank you to reader Bruno for the following addition to this tip.

The easiest thing to do is press Ctrl+E, which brings you directly to the Search (= simple Find) function at the top of the Outlook window – and without needing to have an email open.

Hope you found the bit of history interesting. Feel free to rant by leaving a comment below.

Categories : General, Outlook Email Tips, Outlook Search Tips Comments ( 2 )

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